なにかが見えてくる
Mat's メルマガ


===== ☆ =============================================== ☆ No. 6 ===
     ☆☆                  << 心に響く話 >>
    ☆★☆             -- なにかが見えてくる --
   ☆★★☆                   by Mat
- ☆☆☆☆☆ --------------------------------------- 2010/06/08 ☆ --

最近はいやなニュースばかり耳に飛び込んできて、いやな世の中だという思い
にかられてしまいますが、そのような思いを拭い去るような、心に響くステキ
な話を集めてみました。これらの話の中に世の中の明るさを見出し、人の心の
温かさに触れてみてください。そして、何かを考えるきっかけにしていただけ
れば大変うれしく思います。

******************
**  心に響く話  ** (from Chicken Soup Newsletter)
******************
(ホームページ上ではオンライン辞書を引けるようにもなっています)

My Father's Son
By Mel Donalson

It was one of those excruciatingly cold New England mornings in 1964. 
A four-day-old snow had turned to ice as it pressed against my 
bedroom window.  In my twelve-year-old sleepiness, I staggered 
through the dark hallway into the bathroom, hearing the truck's 
engine idling audibly outside. 

Peering out, I saw his figure - a dark shadow moving against the 
white background, his breath clouding the air when he exhaled.  I 
heard his work boots crunching the hard snow with his giant steps.  I 
saw his dark face hidden beneath a knit cap, the upturned coat collar,
the woolen scarf wrapped around his neck and chin.  One gloved hand 
guided the ice scraper across the truck's windshield; the other 
brushed the shavings like a crystal beard from the truck's old 
weathered face. 

Daddy.  Moving with a quick purpose, driven by a commitment and a 
responsibility taught him thirty-five years earlier in Depression-era 
Georgia.  Daddy.  A silent gladiator who was stepping once more into 
the hostile arena of the day's battle.  Daddy.  Awake while the rest 
of the world slept.  And as he slid behind the steering wheel, 
driving carefully from the driveway onto the street, the truck was 
swallowed up by dawn's dimness.  As I returned to the warmth of my 
blankets - in my own bed, in my own room - I knew I could go back to 
sleep, to dream, because Daddy was outside facing the cold. 

Throughout the many junior- and senior-high mornings I watched my 
father go to work, I never told him how that vision affected me.  I 
simply wondered at his ability to do what he did: keeping the kitchen 
filled with food, making the payments on my music lessons, covering 
the car insurance so I could drive during my senior year, piling the 
Christmas gifts beneath the tree, taking me to Boston to buy new 
clothes, dragging me to church on Sundays, driving me to visit 
college campuses on his day off, kissing and teasing my mother in the 
living room, and nodding off in his easy chair in the middle of a 
sentence.  Perhaps it was because these scenes seemed so ordinary 
that I never spoke of them, never weighed them beyond my own selfish 
adolescent needs. 

And then at college, away from him - when his presence became merely 
the voice over the phone during weekend calls or the name scribbled 
at the bottom of the weekly letter stuffed with a ten-dollar bill - I 
thought other men were more significant than Daddy.  Those men who 
taught my classes in polysyllabic words, wrote articles in journals 
and explained complex theorems and philosophies.  Daddy never did any 
of that - he couldn't with only a high school education.  My hero 
worship made me a disciple to Ivy League scholars who ignited my 
dormant ideas and dead men whose names were printed on book covers, 
buildings and the currency I hungered to possess. 

Then, as I traveled to Europe in my later college years, I realized I 
had seen more, had traveled farther and had achieved greater 
distinctions than Daddy ever had.  I was filled with a sense of self-
importance, puffed up with grad-school grants, deluded with degrees 
and accolades assigned to my name. 

Then, I entered the formidable arena - the job, the relationships, 
the creditors, the pressures and the indignities of racial politics.  
As I reached my late twenties, I looked forward to returning home, 
talking with Daddy, sharing a ball game, watching an old Western on 
television, drinking a beer, listening to a story about his childhood 
days in Georgia and hearing his warm, fulfilling laughter.  I 
rediscovered Daddy again - not as a boy in awe, but with respect as a 
man.  And I realized a truth that I could not articulate as a child - 
Daddy was always there for me.  Unlike the professors, the books, the 
celebrity heroes, the mentors, he was always there.  He was my father,
a man who committed himself to a thankless job in a society that had 
written him off with statistics and stereotypes. 

When I reached my early thirties, when I became a father myself, I 
saw my own father with greater clarity.  As I awoke in the early 
morning hours, compromised my wants, dealt with insults and worked 
overtime in order to give my son his own room - with his own bed and 
his own dreams - I realized I was able to do those things because my 
father had done them for me. 

And now, at age forty-seven, when I spend precious moments with my 
own thirteen-year-old son, when we spend fleeting moments together at 
a movie, on a basketball court, in church or on the highway, I wonder 
what he thinks of me.  At what point will I slip away from his world 
of important men, and will there be a point when he'll return to me 
with a nod of understanding?  How will he measure my weaknesses and 
strengths, my flaws and distinctions, my nightmares and dreams?  Will 
he claim me in the name of love and respect? 

Sometimes the simple lessons are the most difficult to teach.  
Sometimes the most essential truths are the most difficult to learn.  
I hope my son will one day cherish all the lessons and truths that 
have flowed to him, through me, from his grandfather.  And as my son 
grows older, I believe that he, too, will measure his steps by the 
strides I have made for him, just as I have achieved my goals because 
of the strides my father has made for me.  When my son does this, 
perhaps he will feel the same pride and fulfillment that I do when I 
say, "I am my father's son." 

<おじさんの一言>
父親というのは家族のために無言で働くものだ。筆者の父もそうだった。世間
が寝静まっている間に起き、朝早くから仕事という戦いに出かけていく。その
姿を見ながら、12歳の筆者は再び暖かい毛布にもぐりこむのだ。父親が外の世
界で働いていてくれるから、筆者は再び眠りに戻り、夢の中に戻っていくこと
ができるのだった。

中学、高校時代、毎朝父親が仕事に出かけていく姿を見ていたが、その姿がど
れだけ筆者に影響を与えたのか、父親に話したことはなかった。家族が食べ物
に困らないようにしてくれたり、子供を習い事に通わせてくれたり、子供が安
心して車を運転できるように保険料を支払ってくれたり、クリスマスツリーの
下にプレゼントを用意してくれたり、新しい服を買いに連れて行ってくれたり、
などなど、どうしていつも家族のためにそんなことができるのか、ただ不思議
に思うだけだった。父親がいつも家族のためにさりげなくしてくれているこれ
らの行為は、自己中心的な思春期の欲求の陰に隠れてしまい、話題にのぼるこ
ともなく、ごく当たり前の日常になっていたのだ。

大学に入り、家から離れて生活するようになると、父親の存在が薄れ、大学の
教授たちが父親よりもずっと大きな存在となってきた。高校しか出ていない父
にはとうてい彼らの真似はできなかった。さらに大学生活が進むにつれて、筆
者は父よりずっと見聞を広げ、父よりずっと遠くまで旅し、父よりずっと偉く
なった自分に気づいたのだった。

そして、時が過ぎ、仕事や人間関係、その他いろんな面で厳しい実社会へと筆
者は出ていくことになる。20代後半になると、家に帰って、父と話をしたり、
一緒に野球や西部劇を見たり、一緒にビールを飲んだり、ジョージアでの父の
子供時代の話を聞いたり、父のあたたかい笑い声を聞いたり、父と共に過ごす
時間を楽しみにするようになった。子供としてではなく、大人として尊敬の念
を持って父親というものを再発見することになったのだ。子どもの頃にはよく
分からなかったが、父はいつも筆者のためにそばにいてくれた。大学教授や本
や有名人などと違って、いつもそばにいてくれたのだ。

30代になり、自分自身が父親になったとき、自分の父親がそれまでよりもっ
とはっきりと見えるようになった。筆者自身、父親と同様に、朝早く起き、自
分のしたいことも我慢し、人種差別にも直面し、自分の子どものために残業も
するようになって、父親が同じことを自分のためにしてくれたのだから自分に
もこのようなことが自分の子どものためにできるのだと分かったのだ。

そして今、自分が47歳、息子が13歳になって、一緒に映画を見たり、バス
ケットボールをしたりして時を過ごすとき、息子は自分のことをどう思ってい
るだろうか、と筆者は思うのである。いつの時点で自分は彼の世界から姿を消
すのだろう。そして、彼が自分のもとに戻ってくる時があるのだろうか。祖父
からずっと流れてき、父親を通して学んだ教訓や真実を息子がいつかきっと大
事にして自分のものにしてくれる日の来るのを、筆者は心から望んでいる。そ
して、息子も成長するにつれて、筆者の父が筆者のために歩んできてくれたお
かげで、筆者が自分の目標を達成できたのと同じように、筆者が息子のために
進めてきた歩みを通して、息子も自分の歩みを測るであろうと信じている。そ
してその時、息子も、筆者が胸を張って「私は父の息子だ」と言うときに感じ
るのと同じ誇りと充足感を感じてくれるだろうと思う。

今はまだおじさんにべったりの幼いこの子も、成長とともにいつの日かおじさ
んから去って行く時があるのだろうか。そして、またいつの日かきっとおじさ
んのもとに戻ってきてくれる日が来るのだろうか。この話を読み終わって、お
じさんは改めて自分の子どもを見つめ、感慨深く子どもの将来と自分の将来に
静かに思いをはせるのであった。

----------------------------------------------------------------------
おじさんことMat発行の他のメルマガ「英語の諺・名言」「おじさんの戯言」
もよろしくお願いします。
ご購読はこちらから → http://www.geocities.jp/tnkmatm/kodoku.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
ご意見/ご感想: 下記ホームページからお願いします
ホームページ : http://www.geocities.jp/tnkmatm/
                http://www.geocities.co.jp/CollegeLife-Club/5007/
======================================================================



戻る