なにかが見えてくる
Mat's メルマガ


===== ☆ =============================================== ☆ No. 7 ===
     ☆☆                  << 心に響く話 >>
    ☆★☆             -- なにかが見えてくる --
   ☆★★☆                   by Mat
- ☆☆☆☆☆ --------------------------------------- 2010/07/07 ☆ --

最近はいやなニュースばかり耳に飛び込んできて、いやな世の中だという思い
にかられてしまいますが、そのような思いを拭い去るような、心に響くステキ
な話を集めてみました。これらの話の中に世の中の明るさを見出し、人の心の
温かさに触れてみてください。そして、何かを考えるきっかけにしていただけ
れば大変うれしく思います。

******************
**  心に響く話  ** (from Chicken Soup Newsletter)
******************
(ホームページ上ではオンライン辞書を引けるようにもなっています)

A Change of Heart
By Denise Jacoby

Grandma got Grandpa out of bed and helped him to the kitchen for 
breakfast. After his meal, she led him to his armchair in the living 
room where he would rest while she cleaned the dishes. Every so often,
she would check to see if he needed anything.

This was their daily routine after Grandpa's latest stroke. Although 
once a very active man, his severely damaged left arm, difficulty 
walking and slurred speech now kept him housebound. For nearly a year 
he hadn't even been to church or to visit family.


Grandpa filled his hours with television. He watched the news and 
game shows while Grandma went about her day. They made a pact--he was 
not to leave his chair or his bed without her assistance.

"If you fell and I threw my back out trying to help you, who would 
take care of us?" Grandma would ask him. She was adamant about their 
taking care of themselves and living independently.

The Brooklyn brownstone had been their first home and held wonderful 
memories. They weren't ready to leave it behind anytime soon.

Immigrants from Ireland, they met and married in America. Grandma was 
friendly, outgoing and unselfish; Grandpa was reserved, a man devoted 
to his family. But he wasn't big on giving gifts. While he wouldn't 
think twice about giving my grandma the shirt off his back, he 
subscribed to the belief that if you treated your wife well 
throughout the year, presents weren't necessary; so he rarely 
purchased gifts for her.

This had been a sore point in the early days of their marriage. But 
as years passed, Grandma realized what a good man he was. And, after 
all, anything she wanted she was free to buy herself.

It was a cold, gray February morning, a typical winter day in New 
York. As always, Grandma walked Grandpa to his chair.

"I'm going to take a shower now." She handed him the television 
remote. "If you need anything, I'll be back in a little while."

After her shower, she glanced towards the back of Grandpa's recliner 
but noticed that his cane was not leaning in its usual spot. Sensing 
something odd, she walked toward the recliner. He was gone. The 
closet door stood open and his hat and overcoat were missing. Fear 
ran down her spine.

Grandma threw a coat over her bathrobe and ran outside. He couldn't 
have gotten far; he could barely walk on his own.

Desperately, she scanned the block in both directions. Small mounds 
of snow and ice coated the sidewalks. Walking safely would be 
difficult for people who were steady on their feet, much less someone 
in Grandpa's condition.

Where could he be? Why would he leave the house all by himself?

Wringing her hands, she hardly felt the frigid air as she watched 
traffic rush by. She recalled overhearing him tell one of their 
grandchildren recently that he felt he was a "burden." Until this 
last year, he had been strong and healthy; now he couldn't even 
perform the simplest of tasks.

As she stood alone on the street corner, guilt flooded her.

Just then, Grandpa walked around the bend of the corner. Head bowed, 
eyes focused on the sidewalk, he took small, cautious steps. His 
overcoat barely draped the shoulder of his bad arm; his cane and a 
package filled his good arm.

Desperate to reach him, Grandma raced down the block. Relieved to see 
that he was okay, she started to scold.

"I only left you alone for a short while. What did you need so badly 
that couldn't wait? I was so worried about you! What on earth was so 
important?"

Confused and curious, she reached into the brown bag. Before Grandpa 
had a chance to explain, she pulled out a heart-shaped box.

"It's Valentine's Day," Grandpa explained. "I thought you might like 
a box of chocolates."

A gift? All this worry for . . . candy?

"I haven't bought you a gift in a long, long time." His stroke-
impaired words warmed the winter wind.

Tears flooded Grandma's eyes as she hugged his arm to her chest and 
led Grandpa back home.

She shook her head slowly.

It just goes to show, she thought, it's never too late for romance.

<おじさんの一言>
筆者のおじいさんは脳卒中で倒れ、それ以来、おばあさんがずっと面倒を見て
いる。かつては活動的な人だったが、左腕の自由がきかず、歩くのにも苦労し、
言葉もはっきりしゃべれない状況で、自然と家にこもりがちになり、一年近く
も教会にも家族の家にも行っていない。家でテレビを見て過ごすことが多かっ
た。それに、一人で歩いて、もしこけて、それを起こそうとしておばあさんが
腰を痛めたら、誰も世話する人がいなくなるので、おばあさんの補助なしでは
決していすから立ち上がらないというのが二人の約束になっていた。。

二人が初めて新しい生活を始めたブルックリンの家には、二人の思い出がいっ
ぱい詰まっていたので簡単にはその家を出たくなかった。二人はアイルランド
からの移民で、アメリカで出会って結婚した。おばあさんは社交的で、人のこ
とにも目が向き、おじいさんは無口で、家族につくす人であった。しかし、家
族にプレゼントを渡すようなタイプではなかった。普段から妻に優しくしてお
れば、プレゼントなんて必要ないというタイプの人だった。結婚した頃はこの
点が少しひっかかったが、時がたつにつれ、おばあさんにも次第に夫がいい人
だとわかってきた。

ニューヨークの典型的な、寒くてどんよりとした二月の朝のこと、いつものよ
うにおじいさんをいすに座らせ、テレビのリモコンを渡し、それからシャワー
を浴びにバスルームに入った。シャワーを浴びてバスルームから出てくると、
何かおかしいのに気がついた。リクライニングチェアーにはおじいさんの姿は
なく、クローゼットからは 帽子とコートが消えていた。大変なことになった。
おばあさんはとりあえず急いでバスローブの上にコートをはおり、着の身着の
ままで外に出て行った。自分ではほとんど歩けないのだから、そんなに遠くへ
は行っていないはずだ。必死になって、辺りを隈なく探した。道は雪と氷に覆
われ、普通の人でも歩きにくいのに、おじいさんの体ではなおさらのことだ。
一体どこに行ったんだろう。どうして一人で外に出たんだろう。心配のあまり
突き刺すような冷たい空気をほとんど感じることなく、自動車が行き交うのを
じっと見ていた。おばあさんは最近おじいさんが孫に、自分は家族にとって重
荷なんだ、と言うのをたまたま耳にしたことがある。ほんの一年前まで健康そ
のものだったのに、今ではごく簡単なことさえ自分でできなくなっている。

おじいさんを探して一人道端に立っていると、おばあさんは大きな罪の意識に
襲われた。とちょうどその時、角を曲がってやってくるおじいさんの姿が見え
た。下を向き、歩道をじっと見て、ゆっくりと少しずつ気をつけながら歩いて
いた。コートは左肩に垂れ、右腕には杖と、何か包みを持っていた。おばあさ
んは心配で心配でおじいさんに駆け寄り、大丈夫だとわかってほっとしたが、
次の瞬間、声を荒立てている自分に気がついた。「ほんのちょっとの間シャ
ワーを浴びてただけでしょ。それが待てないくらい欲しかったものって一体何
なの。すごく心配したのよ。一体何なの」と言って、頭が混乱したまま、おじ
いさんが持っている茶色い袋に手を伸ばした。そして、おじいさんが説明する
間もなく、中のハートの形をした箱を手にしていた。「バレンタインだよ。チ
ョコレート好きだろ。長い間プレゼントなんてしたことなかったからね」脳卒
中の後遺症でしゃべるのもままならないまま発せられたその言葉は、それだけ
で寒い冬の空気を暖かくするものだった。おじいさんの腕を胸に当て、家まで
手を引いて帰るおばあさんの目からは涙が止めどなく溢れ、「しょうがない人
ね」と、ゆっくりと首を振るのだった。

おじさんもこういうタイプの人間だ。口数が少なく、目立つのを好まず、あま
りおもしろみのない人間かもしれないが、家族を思う気持ちは強く、自分の欲
求を抑えて、家族のために動き、家族の欲求を満足させるよう努力する。プレ
ゼントなどあまりしたことがない。若い頃は人並みに少しはしたが、最近は全
くである。普段から家族のことを思い、家族を大事にしているので、それで十
分ではないか。おじさんは勝手にそう思っている。しかし、たまにちょっと気
のきいたプレゼントはないかと考えることもある。家族に対する愛情をプレゼ
ントという形で改めて示すのもいいかなと思うこともある。でもおじさんには
わからない。どんなものをプレゼントしたらいいのかわからない。で結局、物
より気持ちだということになり、何もプレゼントしないまま過ぎてしまう。筆
者のおじいさんもそうだったんだろうと思う。何かプレゼントをしたいという
気持ちは常に持っていたんだろうと思う。しかし、それができないまま長い年
月がたってしまったんだろう。そして、もうそれほど長くはないと悟ったとき、
長年一緒に歩んでくれた人生のパートナーに何らかの形で感謝の気持ちを表し
たいと思ったのだろう。病気による後遺障害をはねのけ、命の危険を冒してま
でも一人でプレゼントを買いに出かけた。その時のおじいさんの気持ちを思え
ば、「もういいよ。プレゼントなんていらないよ。その気持ちだけで十分だよ。
十分すぎるくらいだよ」と言いたくなる。それほどまでして買ったチョコレー
トはもちろんただのチョコレートではない。お店ではさほど高価なチョコレー
トではないだろう。しかし、お金という尺度では量れない、おじいさんの気持
ちのこもった、とても高価なチョコレートなのだ。物の価値はその値段ではな
く、それにこめられた人の気持ちなのである。そのことを改めて思い知らされ
たおじさんは、なにか晴れ晴れとした気持ちになっていた。

----------------------------------------------------------------------
おじさんことMat発行の他のメルマガ「英語の諺・名言」「おじさんの戯言」
もよろしくお願いします。
ご購読はこちらから → http://www.geocities.jp/tnkmatm/kodoku.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
ご意見/ご感想: 下記ホームページからお願いします
ホームページ : http://www.geocities.jp/tnkmatm/
                http://www.geocities.co.jp/CollegeLife-Club/5007/
======================================================================


戻る